lobsterdesigns: (Default)
The Crazy Women project is finally over, all except the card and accompanying note which will go with it to the charity it's going to. I picked Forward UK because I wanted to focus on something connected to female sexuality, a theme we all explored in this project. They do fantastic work in an area many people do not want to think about. It was challenging and inspiring to work on this project, and I am honoured to have worked with the women of the LJ Birthday Block swap group who contributed, as well as my blog readers and friends who helped with advice and even an impromptu photo shoot in a nearby park.

Photos! )
lobsterdesigns: (Default)
I'm now working on the Crazy Women wall hanging, and have done a certain amount of embroidery and beading. Any suggestions as to where I take it from here? And does the beaded gold spiral look well-balanced?

Pictures, including a photo of the Crazy Women quilt outdoors in the sunlight )
lobsterdesigns: (Waterlily quilt)
I have eventually realised that due to forces beyond my control (OK, buggering up my arms with RSI for months on end was sort of my fault, but you get my drift), I really am not going to finish the 2011 Bead Journal Project. I had fun, I learned some more about beading, and I completed seven nice little pieces. The time has now come to finish them off, and I've decided to make them into little individual wall hangings and give them to assorted friends. They're all 5" on the dotted basting line at the moment, apart from the bottom one where I miscalculated and made it 1/2" bigger. Does anyone have any particular suggestions as to how I should frame them? I think the January grey tree needs an unbeaded border, probably in a darker grey batik with a gentle pattern, while the turquoise round spiral could work with something more elaborate, perhaps even several borders.

Bead Journal Project 2011

In other news, my hands are finally improving, possibly because I've been in an ME crash lately which has made me rest properly, and I'm starting to sew again a bit at a time. Right now I'm finishing off the quilting on the Crazy Women quilt.
lobsterdesigns: (Default)
My hands have been hurting lately, probably due to the joys of ME/CFIDS plus somewhat overenthusiastic quilting a few days ago. I really need to avoid overusing them when they get like this, I had RSI for a month last summer, and quilting is not something that makes them happy. Modest amounts of piecing, on the other hand, I can sometimes get away with. The other day, I finally labelled sections of my needle case with S11 (#11 sharps), A10 (#10 appliqué needles) and so forth. I put in quilting needles, but I keep my quilting kit in a small tupperware box for portability, and the needle case needed to be rolled up to get into it and still took up half of it. Since I only need my quilting betweens for quilting, I made a nice neat little needle case just for them tonight. I made a right pig's ear of the ribbon with the press stud on it, the first time I sewed it in the wrong way around and the second time I got it right but with the press stud on the right side and upside down! That's why there's a bit of beading on it, to hide where I poked at the ribbon. Anyway, I'm quite proud of it, and it's a cute little thing.

Small needle case for quilting betweens Small needle case for quilting betweens - inside

It's two layers of flannel and a layer of quilting cotton. It's also made me realise that I can do this for the two needle cases I owe [livejournal.com profile] mirrorshard and [livejournal.com profile] elfbystarlight, both of which I pieced ages (years?) ago but never got around to making up because the self-adhesive felt I used for mine was such a bugger to work with. You can see them, along with mine on the top left, here.
lobsterdesigns: (Default)
There were two leftover blocks that didn't make it into the quilt. The first is a crazy block using three very similar fabrics, so there wasn't enough contrast for it to sit well with the others. I plan to make a matching cushion with it, as it is fine as a stand-alone piece, and to have fun with embroidery.

The second has a photo below. This was quite an interesting slant on the original brief, with a pixelated design instead of a crazy quilt block. So again it didn't sit well with the others as a quilt, but I think it could make a very effective wall hanging. I was a little unsure about the pixelated look, it's not my usual approach to things, but it's nicer than I thought once I stepped back a bit, and hey, challenges are good for me!

Photo - not terribly work-safe - and thoughts on borders )
lobsterdesigns: (Default)
I proudly present the Crazy Women quilt top. As there is one rather risqué block in there (it's the same one as before, if you've already looked at the blocks), I'm putting it under a cut.

Photos and thoughts on quilting )
lobsterdesigns: (Default)
Below the cut: baby Noah with his quiltlet. As the proud uncle put it, he hasn't quite learned how to stay still for the camera yet! He's six weeks old. They really are the best photos, quilts with babies on them.

Read more... )
lobsterdesigns: (Default)
I made an entire quilt today! Well, it's a basic thing with a piece of flannel for each side and then simply tied, and I confess that I embroidered the recipient's name on it a couple of days ago, but hey, it's still quilty. It was great fun, and I now plan to buy a couple more fabrics from the same owl range and put them aside for future baby quiltlets.

Noah's quilt 2

One more photo and some burbling )

Another finish!

Wednesday, 2 February 2011 08:54 pm
lobsterdesigns: (Default)
Well, mostly. I still have to sign it and make a little hanging sleeve, which I think I'll do tomorrow as I'm feeling lazy. I present to you the final version of Dr F's quilt. It's 8 1/2" x 16", pieced, beaded, and with organza ribbon/satin cord/cotton thong.

Dr F's quilt - final version

ETA: You do know that you can still comment even though I've moved the journal, folks? Go to the little link at the bottom of each post where it directs you to the DreamWidth original post, and then you can sign in using OpenID (takes about three seconds) if you don't have a DW account.

ETA2: I've just realised that the automatic settings for this DW blog weren't allowing non-DW commenters. That has now been fixed, and it should be very easy to comment without having to register with anything.
lobsterdesigns: (Default)
I proudly present to you January, my first Bead Journal Project piece.

BJP January 2011


It's 5" square, as all my pieces will be, and of course hasn't photographed terribly well, between my crappy photography skills (honestly, I can't even hold the camera still half the time) and the difficulty of photographing beads, especially the little mirrors at the centre of each circle. It may be helpful to say that I made a great deal of use of this grey bead mix. I started by drawing three circles onto paper, doing it again with the next size down circle templates (really useful, though beware that the edges aren't well cut and the lines are often askew), and then drawing branching curves in the gaps. I don't think I really thought properly about trees until I had the circles beaded and was filling in the lines, and then I realised what I'd made.

Accidental Schubert )

Welsh quilting

Monday, 20 September 2010 12:17 pm
lobsterdesigns: (Default)
Not long ago, I fell in love with Welsh quilting. While America is undoubtedly the home of an incredible variety of patchwork blocks, the quilting, as in the stage when you go through all three layers with thread (let's call the overall process Quilting to distinguish them), has always left me cold. Modern free-motion quilters such as Leah Day are doing fantastic things, but the traditional quilting patterns are rather limited, sometimes twee, and designs such as the omnipresent feathers just don't do it for me.

I discovered Welsh quilting through a stunning red wholecloth quilt in one of Barbara Chainey's books, and was moved to buy Making Welsh Quilts. It's a fantastic book, containing a thorough discussion of Welsh quilting, photo gallery, projects, and a particularly useful bit at the back which assigns a page to each common motif, such as paisleys, hearts, spirals, leaves, gives a host of examples of how to vary them, and good clear instructions on pattern drafting. I've also found an excellent blog about Welsh quilting, Welsh Quilts, and you can see many beautifully photographed examples intelligently discussed there. The patterns in Welsh quilting really speak to me, being at once classic yet fresh and modern as well. The designs are graceful and elegant, with great scope for creativity yet easy to put together once you know the basic principles.

My second cousin is due to have a baby in about a month, and naturally it took me mere seconds to offer her a baby quilt when I heard the news. Plans for my first Welsh quilt )
lobsterdesigns: (Default)


In other news, you know that strange thing you see in some Egyptian paintings hanging down from goddesses' armpits, or occasionally behind their backs? I've finally found out what it is: a peculiar counterweight to a heavy bead necklace. Apparently the object in question was, amongst other things, associated with potency and fertility. Yep, I could see how people could make those associations.

ETA: Halfway decent photos are finally here! I'll try to take even better ones outdoors before I send it off. Click on the thumbnails for huge images.

lobsterdesigns: (Default)


Unfortunately I'm rather tired out from all the basting, so I've had to take a few days off while I wait for my hands to stop aching, but I'm sure I'll be quilting soon. Ironically, I spent ages with my support worker creating a huge diamond grid from 15 sheets of paper I'd printed out and taped together, and then I absent-mindedly marked the grid on the wrong way around, after all that fuss! So I'll have to recalculate where I put the beaded stars, but I think it should still be perfectly manageable. For some reason everyone seems to be incapable of taking a non-blurry photo of the thing. I can take a close-up of the centre if anyone wants to see the embroidery detail, such as the stripes on the waistband.
lobsterdesigns: (Fish baby quilt)
My mother and I were saying just the other day that it's almost a pity the turtle quilt was sent straight off to my cousin for her baby, as otherwise I'd have loved to exhibit it. It seems I still have a chance after all with the Bloggers' Quilt Festival.



The joke is that this baby took such a long time coming that the first baby quilt I made ended up going to my oldest friend instead. Like me, my cousin is severely disabled, and it took her and her husband four years of gruelling assisted reproduction before their daughter Annaelle was born.

Read more... )
lobsterdesigns: (Waterlily quilt)
Shell quilt top

It's come out very nicely, I think. Now I just have to work out how I want to quilt it. I'm fairly stuck on that one. Aunty D has suggested that as it has so many diagonals, to use horizontal lines for the waves and spirals inside the shell. Not sure if I like that idea or not. It's sitting pinned to a noticeboard above the sofa while I get on with my Hoffman Challenge quilt, I'm sure something will come to me sooner or later. Though D would quite like to be able to sit back on the sofa without hitting his head on the board, especially as it has a few pins on it!
lobsterdesigns: (Default)
Method: hand-pieced and hand-quilted, with a little embroidery.
Size: 36" x 41" plus 1/4" binding.
Piecing design: my own design, based upon photographs of turtles I found online.
Fabrics: about 40 fabrics. Except for the Makower Dimple used for the limbs, they were all batiks. The sea background was all cut from the turquoise in Sew Batik's Gradation range, also known as Nuance, which contains four shades of turquoise.
Batting: Hobbs Polydown.
Backing: Squiggle - Sunkist Orange Spice from Sew Batik. The background is patches of yellow green, light fuchsia and yellow-orange with a yellow-orange and yellow squiggle motif.

Read more... )
lobsterdesigns: (Fish baby quilt)
These little things are addictive. My mother's just had eye surgery, and while attempting to cheer her up and get us off the topic of painkillers, I started talking about quilting. Turns out she'd like a needle case too, please. Here it is in all its glory.

And a pincushion too! )

Needle cases

Tuesday, 14 April 2009 05:26 pm
lobsterdesigns: (Rachel's Star)
I am pausing to make some needle cases. I owe a couple of people birthday presents, I fancy a small job, and it gives me a chance to start playing with ideas on a smaller scale before I turn them into wall hangings. [livejournal.com profile] mirrorshard, this is about your one, so don't click on the link if you don't want the surprise spoilt. Later edit: I've now done the piecing, but I'm going to put the picture next to the one where it was pinned up on the board for comparison.

Here's what I've pinned up on my brand-new design board )
lobsterdesigns: (Default)
I'll do separate posts for the methods later, but meanwhile here are most of the pictures for my earlier work.

Cushion covers )

Carpenter's Square )

Fish baby quilt )

Coffee cosies )

Purple peacock quilt )

Rachel's Star )
lobsterdesigns: (Waterlily quilt)
I'll probably add to this post bit by bit over the next few days, so watch this space. Meanwhile, there's a picture below the cut. I didn't come up with the design myself, it's from Ruth McDowell's Piecing Workshop (you can see hers on the back cover), but that still left plenty for me to do. Now I just have to get up the courage to learn how to use my new sewing machine and try to get it quilted in time for [livejournal.com profile] ghost_of_a_flea's mother's birthday in mid-January.

Other notes )
lobsterdesigns: (Autumnal bedspread)
I finally finished my 89" x 87" bedspread, and you may see it below the cut and also here, here and here. The design was based on this quilt, only I used 30 degree angles where hers are sharper, and batiks in autumnal tones. The diamonds have sides 6" long and were initially sewn in strips of 7, which is half the length of the completed quilt and was a more manageable length to deal with at this stage. Finally I sewed the strips into full-length ones fourteen pieces long, added triangles at each end, and sewed those strips together to make the final quilt. The quilting design can be seen here (well, I added another little spiral in the end), and it's based on Klimt's Stoclet Frieze (the Tree of Life). Since the quilting lines were as far apart as I could get away with, it was surprisingly quick to quilt. Everything was sewn by hand as usual. The worst jobs were laying all the half-strips out to decide which ones should go next to each other, and crawling around on the floor for two hours to do the pin-basting, which had to be done for half the quilt at one time since the floor wasn't big enough.

Picture time )

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